Great choice! Your favorites are temporarily saved for this session. Sign in to save them permanently, access them on any device, and receive relevant alerts.

  • Sailboat Guide

Yamaha 33 is a 33 ′ 4 ″ / 10.2 m monohull sailboat designed by Peter Norlin and built by Yamaha starting in 1976.

Drawing of Yamaha 33

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Embed this page on your own website by copying and pasting this code.

  • About Sailboat Guide

©2024 Sea Time Tech, LLC

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

YBW Forum

  • Search forums
  • Yachting Monthly's Scuttlebutt
  • Thread starter Way
  • Start date 20 Sep 2011
  • 20 Sep 2011

Has anyone heard of the Yamaha 33? Have seen one advertised out there and also that it is similar to the Simga 33 (apparently Yamaha bought the design rights and made their own version?). Huge deep keel, looks seaworthy although I'm sure people will have opinions. There are the original brochures out there ( www.yamahasailboats.org ) but wondering if anyone's got any real-world experience of them/the 33?  

Twister_Ken

Twister_Ken

Well-known member.

I think Southern Sailing ran one as a school boat for many years. Some measure of reassurance, I guess.  

Blueboatman

I am sure I read a mag review when they first came out-some time ago so probably YM and definitely before the advent of the newer mags from other stables.  

doris

Hamble School of Yachting had one for ages in the late 80s. A terrific boat, v well made and as such too expensive to compete in the real market over here.  

Way said: Has anyone heard of the Yamaha 33? Have seen one advertised out there and also that it is similar to the Simga 33 (apparently Yamaha bought the design rights and made their own version?). Huge deep keel, looks seaworthy although I'm sure people will have opinions. There are the original brochures out there ( www.yamahasailboats.org ) but wondering if anyone's got any real-world experience of them/the 33? Click to expand...

Once visited a boat (1/2 tonner?) where the engine box also served as the base for the saloon table. Good place - right on top of the keel for weight distribution and you could take all the panels off for access to all four sides.  

concentrik

Twister_Ken said: Once visited a boat (1/2 tonner?) where the engine box also served as the base for the saloon table. Good place - right on top of the keel for weight distribution and you could take all the panels off for access to all four sides. Click to expand...

alteredoutlook

Twister_Ken said: I think Southern Sailing ran one as a school boat for many years. Some measure of reassurance, I guess. Click to expand...

Wasn't that the Solent School of Yachting's originally(David Olly's firm) and with his Westerly Fulmars as well? Saw it during this summer at Warsash and Cowes, Still goes well. Brochure says 37footer? ianat182  

jwilson said: Engines under the saloon table quite common, and much to be said for it (weight distribution, access etc) - but on the Yamaha 33 the engine is actually right up in the forecabin ! Click to expand...

30boat

There are quite a few in Hong Kong which is were I bought my previous boat a Peterson 30 halftonner. The Yamahas were very well built with overenginered keel stepped masts still my halftonner would sail rings around them.This is not to say they were slow just that those Petersons were really fast especially to windward. I once saw a Yamaha33 chainplate that had failed to crevice corrosion because it had been made by welding two smaller bars together instead of just using a larger single bar.The water got between the plates and corroded them right through taking the mast down when it failed.A point to check.  

Thanks for all of the replies...as always, very useful. Makes sense...the broker said it was an ex-Sailing School boat and I think it might be Southern Sailing's they are selling. She does look good and well put together. Doesn't look "cramped" to me, although I currently have a Trapper 28 so campared to her she is absolutely huge. Not sure about the engine comment...maybe the sailing school moved the installation as it was right under the campionway in the 'normal' position? Didn't look like an alteration either. I take it noone knows about the Sigma 33 / buying of design rights then? Thanks for the help.  

  • 21 Sep 2011

penfold

The Scampi had the same engine forward arrangement, as did the Norlin 34 as originally penned. Peter Norlin obviously liked it that way. Some Swan 36s have the less extreme engine midships, as do other S&S designs of that era.  

Way said: I take it noone knows about the Sigma 33 / buying of design rights then? Click to expand...

graham

graham said: Not on all of them, I sailed on a Yamaha 33 some years back and the engine was in the conventional under the companionway steps place. Good strong seaworthy boats but if used as a seaschool boat may have had some hard use and abuse. Click to expand...

jimi

If it is the Southern Sailing one , the engine is in the normal place! I did my YM practical in it. Good solid boats that took a LOT of battering!  

jimi said: If it is the Southern Sailing one , the engine is in the normal place! I did my YM practical in it. Good solid boats that took a LOT of battering! Click to expand...

Members online

  • James_Calvert
  • Frank Holden
  • Touching Cloth
  • LittleSister

Share this page

Sailboat Owners Forums

  • Forums New posts Unanswered threads Register Top Posts Email
  • What's new New posts New Posts (legacy) Latest activity New media
  • Media New media New comments
  • Boat Info Downloads Weekly Quiz Topic FAQ 10000boatnames.com
  • Classifieds Sell Your Boat Used Gear for Sale
  • Parts General Marine Parts Hunter Beneteau Catalina MacGregor Oday
  • Help Terms of Use Monday Mail Subscribe Monday Mail Unsubscribe

Is this Y-33 worth restoring?

  • Thread starter djghosie
  • Start date Aug 22, 2022
  • Brand-Specific Forums

djghosie

HI all, This is probably the only group I could find active threads about the Yamaha 33, hopefully I could get insights from you guys with the 33. Recently a friend of mine wants to get rid of his Y33 due to extensive leaking, having inspected the boat myself I'm on the edge whether to take it and restore it or let the guy scrap it. My concren is not the leakage itself which I can definitely get to the bottom of it since they are only usual leakage from the gap between lens and hull. The big leakage was caused from the broken hatch which as you could imagine, when it rains it fills! But due to the flooding to the saloon, all wooden partitions are rotten. Therefore my concern would be whether I could do away with all interior partitionings as I'm afraid the ones going from top to bottom could be structural. If they are not then I could really change the interior layout since the head can be relocated. The hull itself is not leaking so the integrity of the boat should be sound. Thank you in advance for your advices and comments.  

Attachments

IMG_20220817_165444.jpg

That is a huge project. Love the Yammie, but the most expensive boat ever is a free one. That said, it can be done. You can PM me with your phone number if you want to chat.  

justsomeguy

justsomeguy

jssailem

SBO Weather and Forecasting Forum Jim & John

Only you can answer that question. Do you want to spend the time it will take to put THIS boat back into shape? Will you have a boat that you want to sail When you are done? Looking at the interior conditions you will have a year‘s worth of labor and materials to rebuild the interior. The bulkheads are structural. They hold the hull to shape and spread the loads of sailing across the hull shape. Taking them all out will collapse the hull. Based on your observation: ”The hull itself is not leaking so the integrity of the boat should be sound.” I will assume sailboat design and structure are a new to you. With the water damage to the bulkheads you can not conclude that the boat is sound. With a damaged boat all parts are suspect till you prove they are not. Why you may ask, when you untie the lines and push the boat away from the dock you are trusting your life and the lives of your crew to the boat. I am having a bit of confusion reconciling with this statement “On my fifth season of competitive sailing”. Will this boat be used for competition Or is it to be a live aboard?  

Ralph Johnstone

Ralph Johnstone

Looks like a very expensive boat from here.  

shemandr

What you mean "Restore"? If you want a bristol yacht you'll spend stupid money and time. Check out thread regarding a Mega 30 (@switchingtoglide?) about what it takes in skill, time and money. There are some other threads here that should sober you up. If you just want a boat to sail it's still a big project. Any smallish in the early 20's could have you on the water in no time and reasonable expense. Read post #3 and repeat until it sinks in.  

Tedd

I'm glad I'm not you because, for me, seeing a boat like that is like seeing a puppy at the humane society: I just want to take it home and give it a good life. I can understand your temptation. I'm hesitant to say anything without being able to look more closely, but I don't see anything wood that jumps out at me as structural. Perhaps the one bulkhead between the main salon and the v-berth, but even that I'm doubtful about. I would have a thorough look for wood encased in fiberglass that's rotten. Not that it's necessarily a show-stopper, but it could be. If you're skilled at cabinetry, or even if it's a skill you want to have, it seems like a good project. The above-deck equipment looks reasonable. Inside it needs to be stripped bare, cleaned, and then completely rebuilt. But if that's the kind of project you're looking for it seems like a good candidate.  

Tedd said: I'm hesitant to say anything without being able to look more closely, but I don't see anything wood that jumps out at me as structural. Perhaps the one bulkhead between the main salon and the v-berth, but even that I'm doubtful about. I would have a thorough look for wood encased in fiberglass that's rotten. Click to expand

Helpful

I think I wouldn’t take this on while paying slip fees. I’d rather have it at my house or on the hard close to it. Running back and forth to the boat for supplies, equipment and other stuff if relentless with this level of work.  

Roland5048

A dock neighbor of mine bought a 37 Irwin three years ago whose interior looked like the one in your post. Deck was just as bad. I knew this boat quite well as it was my friend's and we delivered it from Key Largo to the Fl west coast where it now sits. The boat has not been out under its own power since we brought it here in 2011. They finally started working on her just less than a year ago it will be at least two years before she leaves the dock. Just the $$$ they are going to be shelling out, not to mention the hundreds of hours of labor, they could have bought something similar for under 20K and be on the water sailing instead of being tied to a slip and shelling out even more money on slip rent. Just sayin'.  

jssailem said: Looking at the interior conditions you will have a year‘s worth of labor and materials to rebuild the interior. The bulkheads are structural. They hold the hull to shape and spread the loads of sailing across the hull shape. Taking them all out will collapse the hull. Click to expand
jssailem said: I will assume sailboat design and structure are a new to you. With the water damage to the bulkheads you can not conclude that the boat is sound. With a damaged boat all parts are suspect till you prove they are not. Why you may ask, when you untie the lines and push the boat away from the dock you are trusting your life and the lives of your crew to the boat. Click to expand
jssailem said: I am having a bit of confusion reconciling with this statement “On my fifth season of competitive sailing”. Will this boat be used for competition Or is it to be a live aboard? Click to expand
justsomeguy said: No. Click to expand
mermike said: That is a huge project. Love the Yammie, but the most expensive boat ever is a free one. That said, it can be done. You can PM me with your phone number if you want to chat. Click to expand
Ralph Johnstone said: Looks like a very expensive boat from here. Click to expand
shemandr said: What you mean "Restore"? If you want a bristol yacht you'll spend stupid money and time. Check out thread regarding a Mega 30 (@switchingtoglide?) about what it takes in skill, time and money. There are some other threads here that should sober you up. If you just want a boat to sail it's still a big project. Any smallish in the early 20's could have you on the water in no time and reasonable expense. Read post #3 and repeat until it sinks in. Click to expand
Tedd said: If you're skilled at cabinetry, or even if it's a skill you want to have, it seems like a good project. The above-deck equipment looks reasonable. Inside it needs to be stripped bare, cleaned, and then completely rebuilt. But if that's the kind of project you're looking for it seems like a good candidate. Click to expand
MikeHoncho said: I think I wouldn’t take this on while paying slip fees. I’d rather have it at my house or on the hard close to it. Running back and forth to the boat for supplies, equipment and other stuff if relentless with this level of work. Click to expand
Roland5048 said: A dock neighbor of mine bought a 37 Irwin three years ago whose interior looked like the one in your post. Deck was just as bad. I knew this boat quite well as it was my friend's and we delivered it from Key Largo to the Fl west coast where it now sits. The boat has not been out under its own power since we brought it here in 2011. They finally started working on her just less than a year ago it will be at least two years before she leaves the dock. Just the $$$ they are going to be shelling out, not to mention the hundreds of hours of labor, they could have bought something similar for under 20K and be on the water sailing instead of being tied to a slip and shelling out even more money on slip rent. Just sayin'. Click to expand

jon hansen

  • This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register. By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies. Accept Learn more…

Review of Yamaha 33

Basic specs..

The boat is typically equipped with an inboard Yanmar YSM12 diesel engine.

The fuel tank has a capacity of 70 liters (18 US gallons, 15 imperial gallons).

Sailing characteristics

This section covers widely used rules of thumb to describe the sailing characteristics. Please note that even though the calculations are correct, the interpretation of the results might not be valid for extreme boats.

What is Capsize Screening Formula (CSF)?

The capsize screening value for Yamaha 33 is 2.06, indicating that this boat would not be accepted to participate in ocean races.

What is Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed?

The theoretical maximal speed of a displacement boat of this length is 7.0 knots. The term "Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed" is widely used even though a boat can sail faster. The term shall be interpreted as above the theoretical speed a great additional power is necessary for a small gain in speed.

The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Yamaha 33 is about 184 kg/cm, alternatively 1030 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 184 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 1030 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

Sailing statistics

This section is statistical comparison with similar boats of the same category. The basis of the following statistical computations is our unique database with more than 26,000 different boat types and 350,000 data points.

What is Motion Comfort Ratio (MCR)?

What is L/B (Length Beam Ratio)?

What is Displacement Length Ratio?

SA/D (Sail Area Displacement ratio) Indicates how fast the boat is in light wind: - Cruising Boats have ratios 10-15 - Cruiser-Racers have ratios 16-20 - Racers have ratios above 20 - High-Performance Racers have ratios above 24 Sail-area/displacement ratio (SA/D ratio): 17.30

Maintenance

If you need to renew parts of your running rig and is not quite sure of the dimensions, you may find the estimates computed below useful.

This section is reserved boat owner's modifications, improvements, etc. Here you might find (or contribute with) inspiration for your boat.

Do you have changes/improvements you would like to share? Upload a photo and describe what you have done.

We are always looking for new photos. If you can contribute with photos for Yamaha 33 it would be a great help.

If you have any comments to the review, improvement suggestions, or the like, feel free to contact us . Criticism helps us to improve.

yamaha 33 sailboat review

SV Seven, a Yamaha 33

Seven is a Yamaha 33 Sloop built in Hiroshima Japan. She is a 1978 model originally delivered in Southern California, then shipped to British Columbia in 2007. I purchased her in May 2017, she was relaunched and commissioned. I was the third owner of Seven but sold her in March 2022.

She was called Bonza in California the her Canadian owners move her to Nanaimo and renamed her Trinity in 2007. She sat on the hard for two years before I acquired her May of 2017. We cruised the Gulf and San Juan Islands for a few weeks, then made a two day dash down the coast to her new home in Portland, Oregon. We cruised Seven all over the Salish sea and down the Oregon coast as far south at Bandon.

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Specifications

LOA: 33 feet, 4 inches

LWL: 26 ft, 11 inches

Beam: 11 ft

Sail Area: 492 ft

Displacement: 10,854 lb

Ballast, (Iron): 4409 lb

Cruise: 5 kn

Max: 6.5 kn

Theoretical: 7 kn

Draft: 6 feet 3 inches

Air Draft: 46’7” plus antenna

Fuel: 20 gallons

Motoring Range: 190 miles

Potable Water: 52 gallons

Yanmar YSM12 10 hp, (12 hp peak)

Shaft Rotation: Counter Clockwise

Yamaha built boats for the American market from 1976 to 1985. The boats continued in the Japanese domestic market until 1990. The North American line up included the Y25, Y26, Y30, Y33 and Y36. Rarer models included a 28 foot cruiser, a 29 foot center cockpit and a 37 foot version.

The Yamaha 33 is was drawn to meet the old International Offshore Rule by Peter Norlin for the Yamaha design team. One of the hallmarks of these designs is the tall, high-aspect mainsail that won't sail well with out a headsail.

Earlier Yamaha 33's were equipped with an under-powered single cylinder Yanmar YSM12 diesel located in the bow. Somewhere around 1980, Yamaha upgraded the boat to a more powerful Yanmar twin under the cockpit.

In 1978 an unmodified Yamaha 33 took second place in the OSTAR 'Round Britain Double-handed race. Other Yamaha 33 sloops successfully campaigned the Transpac to Honolulu. Linda Weber-Rettie skippered Rough and Rettie in the single-handed 1980 Transpac completing the run in 19 days and 5 hours. Foxx Fire raced in 1992, 1996 and 2000 with best run of 15 days and 6 hours.

Today, several Yamaha 33's are cruising. In 2017, Pino and Ichiban are in the Pacific. Fellowship wandered the from the US West Coast to Australia for more than 10 years before retiring from cruising.

The Yamaha 33 is a seaworthy and comfortable boat that will carry a cruising sailor across oceans. The boat's deep draft ensures she points high into the wind, but bars her from shallow water. The hull form is fast, but can pound when working to weather. Thirty three feet is arguably as large a boat as a single crew can manage with out help. The boats have proven to be seaworthy, safe and well constructed.

The Yamaha 33 is a 33.33ft masthead sloop designed by Yamaha/Norlin and built in fiberglass by Yamaha since 1976.

The Yamaha 33 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is originally very small. There is a short water supply range.

Yamaha 33 sailboat under sail

Yamaha 33 for sale elsewhere on the web:

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Main features

Login or register to personnalize this screen.

You will be able to pin external links of your choice.

yamaha 33 sailboat review

See how Sailboatlab works in video

yamaha 33 sailboat review

We help you build your own hydraulic steering system - Lecomble & Schmitt

Accommodations

Builder data, other photos.

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Modal Title

The content of your modal.

Personalize your sailboat data sheet

SailNet Community banner

  • Forum Listing
  • Marketplace
  • Advanced Search
  • All Topics Sailing
  • Skills & Seamanship
  • Seamanship & Navigation
  • SailNet is a forum community dedicated to Sailing enthusiasts. Come join the discussion about sailing, modifications, classifieds, troubleshooting, repairs, reviews, maintenance, and more!

Yamaha 33 as offshore cruiser?

  • Add to quote

I''m thinking of buying a Yamaha 33. If anyone has experience sailing this boat in offshore conditions, I''d like to hear their comments.  

yamaha 33 sailboat review

I have limited experience with the Yamaha 33 in onshore sailing that would suggest that they would not make very good offshore boats. The Yamahas were intended to be IOR racer/cruisers and based on my experience with their sailing characteristics they would make a nice coastal cruiser but would not be ideal offshore. They do seem to be well constructed and sail well in moderate conditions. They get a little dicey in gustier conditions. Jeff  

yamaha33 website You might like to check out http://members.lycos.co.uk/yamaha33 for info on Yamaha 33 as a cruising boat. Check out http://members.ycos.co.uk/pacificeddy for details of FellowShip's Pacific cruising grounds!  

yamaha 33 sailboat review

gud...that was from 2002...welcome aboard but check your dates before posting!  

a y33 is a y33 Yamaha 33's are Yamaha 33's - whether the sailing was done in the 90s or will be done sometime in the near future makes no difference. Winds and seas and the boats that sail them could care less what year it is! Our Yamaha 33 "FellowShip" has continued to cruise non-stop with new owners in Australia... so yeah, a Yamaha 33 can be a good cruising boat ! Remember, the PERFECT cruising boat does not exist.  

My point was that you are responding to a question that was asked in 2002 and the person has not been back since. Your message is for no one.  

It was useful to me just now.  

yamaha 33 sailboat review

thread maintenance Cam A couple of weeks ago I tried to contact sailnet and get them to give me the job of thread janitor. I offered to go through all these old threads and "lock" them so responses could no longer be made to dead threads I also offered to delete user generated threads(not the articles mind you) more than 5 months old or so that have had ZERO responses to them (there's actually quite a few) and so pose no gain for the site they just take up dead space. I could also delete blatant spam as I read throught these older threads I'm not asking for compensation - membership is enough , I would do it because I've got the time and I would like to help out Maybe you could go to bat for me ? Or not ! It's just something I think should be done and I have the time and inclination to do it. Have a great day Kevin  

yamaha 33 sailboat review

LOL... Considering that all two of Soyokaze's posts were in 2002 and on the topic of Yamaha 33's... it is likely that he's not reading sailnet anymore... might have bought the boat and gone bluewater with it... and disappeared.  

Right now, Sailnet is having some moderation and other technical staffing problems IMHO... moderation has been pretty much non-existent since Cam dropped out.  

SD Oh I most definitely do not want to be a moderator not after the C****yJ*e fiascoe and what is currently shaping up with SailLikeTheWind but I don't mind going afterwards and doing a little swabbing the decks  

ciao 4 now Okay Okay Okay. Just thought others might be interested. There are still quite a few Yamaha 33s that come up for sail and by googling Yamaha 33 one gets to your site, and this old posting. Just thought I'd add my 2 cents and get a dialogue going - which I did. So that's it. Ciao 4 now.  

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Well, look up 'fellowshi'p [as previously mentioned about 5 years ago]. I knew the 'next' owners who kept her like new. Currently she is sitting opposite our boat in the marina. A yamaha 33 is a fast, safe, tough boat. Go for it mate.  

I stumbled across this thread as I was learning about the Yamaha 33. Although the thread is old, the info is still new to me. Thanks for leaving it open and accessible.  

Old threads are a good source of info. I just purchased a Y33 today. I trolled through many old threads on varius forums to help make an informed decision on a boat purchase.  

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Had a friend that took his Yamaha 33 from Seattle down to the Chilian Channels to Ushuia and then sailed to Australia.  

Yeah, Thanks for leaving these older threads. The boat is still older than the thread and any knowledge, old or new is still pertinent. I'm not totally sure but I think the the Yamaha 33 has a cast iron keel like the Yammy 30 has. That info could be a factor in someones purchase choices. Knowing that you gotta inspect that keel annually and change the keel bolts regularly is a considerable amount of extra maintenance that people buying older Beneteaus may not get told by the seller either. Ask me how I know this! Cheers, Pete  

I took my yamaha33 all around the Pacific ocean (South Pacific, NZ, Fiji, Japan etc...). It's doable. It's not a comfortable boat, but it's tough as hell. (these old threads were and continue to be useful to me, so thought id contribute)  

  • ?            
  • 174.9K members

Top Contributors this Month

yamaha 33 sailboat review

  • New Sailboats
  • Sailboats 21-30ft
  • Sailboats 31-35ft
  • Sailboats 36-40ft
  • Sailboats Over 40ft
  • Sailboats Under 21feet
  • used_sailboats
  • Apps and Computer Programs
  • Communications
  • Fishfinders
  • Handheld Electronics
  • Plotters MFDS Rradar
  • Wind, Speed & Depth Instruments
  • Anchoring Mooring
  • Running Rigging
  • Sails Canvas
  • Standing Rigging
  • Diesel Engines
  • Off Grid Energy
  • Cleaning Waxing
  • DIY Projects
  • Repair, Tools & Materials
  • Spare Parts
  • Tools & Gadgets
  • Cabin Comfort
  • Ventilation
  • Footwear Apparel
  • Foul Weather Gear
  • Mailport & PS Advisor
  • Inside Practical Sailor Blog
  • Activate My Web Access
  • Reset Password
  • Customer Service

yamaha 33 sailboat review

  • Free Newsletter

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Valiant 40: Reshaping the Cruising Hull

Small but mighty Pixie has weathered gales and brought solo-circumnavigator Bill Norrie home safely. (Photo/ Bert Vermeer)

Bristol Channel Cutter 28: Circumnavigator’s Choice

A moderate displacement and a high aspect ratio rig means the Hunter 35.5 will do well in a light-air coastal environment. (Photo/ Bert Vermeer)

Hunter 35.5 Legend Used Boat Review

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Pearson Rhodes 41/Rhodes Bounty II Used Sailboat Review

Irwin Vise-Grip Wire Stripper. (Photo/ Adam Morris)

Best Crimpers and Strippers for Fixing Marine Electrical Connectors

600-watt solar panel system on Summer Twins 28 sailing catamaran Caribbean Soul 2. (Photo/ Clifford Burgess)

Thinking Through a Solar Power Installation

yamaha 33 sailboat review

How Does the Gulf Stream Influence our Weather?

A lithium conversion requires a willing owner and a capable craft. Enter the Privilege 435 catamaran Confianza.

Can You Run a Marine Air-Conditioner on Battery Power?

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Practical Sailor Classic: The Load on Your Rode

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Anchor Rodes for Smaller Sailboats

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Ground Tackle Inspection Tips

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Shoe Goo II Excels for Quick Sail Repairs

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Solutions for a Stinky Holding Tank

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Diesel Performance Additives

yamaha 33 sailboat review

What Oil Analysis Reveals About Your Engine

Hidden Maintenance Problems: Part 3 – Gremlins in the Electrics

When water seeps into a balsa wood core, it eventually rots and needs to be replaced. Photo courtesy of Epoxyworks.com

Seepage or Flooding? How To Keep Water Out of the Boat

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Painting a New Bootstripe Like a Pro

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Three-Model BBQ Test

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Alcohol Stoves— Swan Song or Rebirth?

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Living Aboard with an Alcohol Stove

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Choosing the Right Fuel for Your Alcohol Stove

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Preparing Yourself for Solo Sailing

yamaha 33 sailboat review

How to Select Crew for a Passage or Delivery

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Preparing A Boat to Sail Solo

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Re-sealing the Seams on Waterproof Fabrics

Waxing and Polishing Your Boat

Waxing and Polishing Your Boat

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Reducing Engine Room Noise

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Tricks and Tips to Forming Do-it-yourself Rigging Terminals

marine toilet test

Marine Toilet Maintenance Tips

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Learning to Live with Plastic Boat Bits

  • Sailboat Reviews

The Dual-Purpose C&C 33 Mark II

The old new c&c 33 proves to be a formidable racer that can also deliver you over the horizon..

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Photos by Otto Rascon

When the C&C company shut down operations in 1986, it was big news in the North American boating community. Since the companys formation in 1969, it had been a stalwart of the industry-the leading Canadian builder, by far, and one of the major brands wherever fiberglass sailboats raced or cruised.

C&Cs lineup always featured the dual-purpose racer-cruiser, and always aimed for quality construction and detail, fitting a market niche below the outstanding luxury yacht but above the standard, midline fiberglass auxiliary. C&C boats are know for good-looking moderate designs, a tradition started by the original partners-the two Cs, George Cuthbertson and George Cassian-and the companys chief designer, Rob Ball. Performance also was a C&C hallmark. Most of its models were heavily marketed as serious racers, and even old C&Cs continue to be actively raced in PHRF fleets today. (For example, there were 14 registered to compete in the 2015 Chicago to Mackinac Race.)

C&C was the first major company to commit to cored hull construction, and only Tillotson-Pearson compared to C&C in terms of experience with balsa-cored laminates. The builder also was the first major company to commit to solid rod rigging, and they had a tradition of rigging and equipping their boats with first-class spars and fittings.

The C&C 33 is often referred to as the new C&C 33 or the C&C 33 Mark II (33-2), to distinguish it from the C&C 33 Mark I, which was produced between 1974 and l977. While some of the specs are similar, the Mark II is an entirely different boat, not sharing any of the tooling of the Mark I. The Mark I was widely regarded as one of the prettiest racers around, and 209 of them were built.

In design, the C&C 33 Mark II has conservative lines. Like other C&C models, it has a flat sheer, sharply reversed transom and sharply angled bow. The hull has a fine entry and cutaway forefoot. Theres a hard turn to the bilge about a foot below the waterline, and the very center of the hull is flat. A fin keel was the standard, but a shorter fin and a keel/centerboard combination were available options. A small skeg is fitted ahead of the spade rudder. According to owners, this setup allows for precise turning in tight spaces.

The Mark II was introduced in 1984, and over 200 of them were built in the four years the boat was in production-impressive considering the companys business problems in the middle of the run, and the heavy competition in this size from American and European companies.

Construction

The Mark IIs hull construction represented a departure from typical C&C practices, in that only the forward panels of the hull are balsa cored. The rest of the hull is a conventional hand lay-up of mat and roving, with an isophthalic gelcoat and skinning resin. The 33s larger sisters (35, 38, 41, and 44) have balsa coring throughout their hulls, while the smaller sisters (30 and 27) have no coring at all in the hull.

The cored laminate offered stiffness and strength combined with light weight, and it was one of C&Cs keys to building tough, lightweight race boats that wouldnt flex too much. To achieve stiffness and strength without the coring, C&C used what they call a spider system: basically a structural framing bonded to the hull and integrated with the attachment points for the rig and keel. The hull laminate itself becomes relatively less important structurally, as the frame becomes the primary load-bearing structure of the boat.

The deck is one-piece molding with balsa core in the horizontal surfaces, and hardware is backed with both aluminum and Coremat for strength in the attachment points.

The hull-to-deck joint is standard, with an inward-turning hull flange on which the deck is set. Stainless bolts run through the joint and through an aluminum toerail that covers the joint. The whole stem fitting as well as the corner pieces for the toerail are the heavy aluminum castings that are traditional on C&C boats, but it is interesting that C&C used plastic moldings for the stanchion bases on the 33.

When new, the Mark IIs had good quality gelcoat and generally fair hulls. But if youre considering buying a used one, be sure to look for signs of stress cracking or crazing as most of these have been raced a lot-some quite hard-over the last 25 years. Our reviewer examined one, built in 1988, that had only minor crazing and a surprisingly good quality deck, but the owner explained it had not been actively raced in the past.

The standard fin keel (6-foot, 4-inch draft) is external lead, bolted to a stub on the hull. The centerboard option is unusual in that it is a fiberglass molding with some lead inside, and the board is fitted entirely inside a shallow keel (4-foot, 4-inch draft) fitted to the hull.

The fiberglass board is lighter (for lifting) and quieter than a more common steel board, which tends to bang around in the centerboard trunk. The fiberglass molding also makes for a better-shaped and fairer fin for upwind work. The lifting cable is housed inside the keel, so it presents no drag and makes no noise at speed. The cable passes through the cabin and is housed in a stainless-steel tube, which also supports the cabin table, and is led to a stopper and winch on the aft end of the cabin house.

The fin keel weighs 3,975 pounds (42 percent of total displacement); the keel/centerboard, at 5,258 pounds, is much heavier. Nominal displacement for the fin-keel version is 9,450 pounds; for the centerboard version, its 10,733 pounds.

The 33s rudder is fiberglass over a webbing of stainless welded to the stainless-steel rudder stock. If youre considering buying a C&C 33, be sure to look over the rudder and skeg carefully.

Also, as is the case with most 25-year-old, external ballast keel boats, the ballast should be lowered and the keel bolts inspected before purchase, especially if the boat is sailed offshore. C&Cs are among the production boats (like Catalinas, Hunters, and Cals) that have been known to show a keel smile, where the keel bolts work loose and water gets in between hull and keel, causing the bolts to corrode. Usually a product of not torquing the keel bolts periodically, the keel smile is due more to a lack of proper maintenance than design.

The model that we sailed had a rig from the C&C spar shop, known in its time as a builder of sturdy high-performance rigs. The spars on later models were from Offshore Spars in Detroit.

The mast and boom are fairly heavy extrusions, painted white, with integral grooves for taking bolt rope or slugs. The mast came standard with internal halyards and lifts, as well as an internal wiring conduit and VHF cable. The boom has built-in slab reefing gear. The mast is stepped on the keel.

The standard standing rigging is made up of Navtec stainless rod, tangs, and turnbuckles, with 1 x 19 stainless for the adjustable babystay and for the split part of the lower backstay. Original main and jib halyards were stainless with rope tails. The shroud chainplates, set inboard for close sheeting, are attached to the hull by stainless rods between the deck and hull anchor points.

The Mark II came standard with good quality hardware for rig control. Spinnaker winches and gear, boom vang, and backstay adjuster were options.

Engine/Mechanical Systems

The original Yanmar 2GM engine is a bit tight in the 33s engine compartment, but otherwise the installation is first rate. The engine beds are actually part of the structural spider beams. The engine box is insulated with sound deadener, and the engine is about as quiet as you can expect a two-cylinder diesel to be. The standard solid prop should be replaced with a folding prop.

The electrical system and plumbing are well done. Electricity includes a 12-volt system with ample interior lighting. A 120-volt shore-power system, with a 50-foot shore cord, was standard equipment.

A three-burner, propane stove with oven also was standard, as was hot-and-cold pressurized water. The 30-gallon water tank is adequate for typical cruising, though ocean sailors may want to convert the standard 24-gallon holding tank to freshwater storage.

Performance

The 20-horsepower Yanmar is big enough to handle the boat in most conditions. We were under power only in fairly flat water. The boat was fitted with an optional Martek folding prop, and we had no problems backing or turning. The engine pushed the boat to hull speed easily. We suspect a big head sea would challenge the peak output of the engine, probably slowing the boat to 4 knots or so, but the amount of power is ample for all reasonable sailors in almost all conditions.

Steering is with the standard 36-inch destroyer wheel. Throttle and shift controls are integral to the pedestal, and visibility over the deckhouse is good when you are sitting on the skippers bubble hump behind the wheel.

The aluminum fuel tank holds 20 gallons, which should be good for about 180 miles of powering under normal conditions. The engine control panel is in one bay of the T-shaped cockpit. You can’t see it easily from the steering position, but thats a very minor inconvenience.

Access to the engine is through the removable companionway steps, through opening panels on both the port and starboard side of the engine, and through the cockpit seat locker.

The boat looks like it should be an all-around wholesome boat, but we initially thought of it as not particularly a standout in its size and price range. Our test sail convinced us otherwise. We found the 33-2 to be a fine sailer, just about everything we would want in its size.

The C&C 33 Mark II performs well without demanding the incessant tweaking and crew movement of so many high-performance boats. We sailed the centerboard version and evaluated a deep-keel version, and reviewers found no particular shortcomings in eithers performance.

With a good set of sails, the centerboard test boat was at least as weatherly as any boat in its PHRF division. We tried sailing the reaches and the runs with the board up and with the board down, and we could not discern any difference in speed-though as charterer, we deferred to the owners conviction that the boat was faster off the wind with the board up. The boat seemed to steer as well with the board up as with it down.

With the extra weight, the centerboard model is a little harder to push around a race course in light air, but in 15-knot winds, she had to ask no favors, and in 22-knot winds, she was a pleasure to sail compared to the other boats on the race course.

In absolute terms, we know that there are faster boats around. Most of them, unfortunately, are a pain to handle as the wind pipes up, and we wouldnt want to sail them on some of the long, rainy slogs that we often encounter in cruising. Shorthanded, most of the faster boats are miserable. The C&C 33, in contrast, is an easy sailer, respectable in light winds, and a pleasure in heavy.

C&C 33 Mark II boat

courtesy of Olson’s Classic Yachts

The deck layout on the C&C 33 is conventional. The double lifelines with lifeline gates, pulpit, and pushpit are sturdy, well made, and came as standard equipment. The pushpit has a gate that can be fitted with stern ladder-a good idea for both the racer and cruiser.

The foredeck is quite narrow, so anchoring and headsail handling can be difficult. The sidedecks leading aft are wide because of the inboard shrouds and easy to move along.

Because of the sculpting and window shape, the cabinhouse looks low, but it is actually quite high-a difficult step up from the sidedecks or cockpit for some. Fortunately, because all the lines lead aft to the back edge of the cabin, theres not much occasion to walk on the cabintop abaft the mast. Forward of the mast, the cabin slopes gradually into the deck, and movement is easy. However, the skylight over the head and the forward hatch are slippery stumble-makers and need to have nonskid tape put on them.

Our test boat did not have a dodger, and the sculpting of the cabin house may make it difficult to design a wide one. A narrow dodger, fitting just over the companionway, would work well.

The cockpit is a conventional T-shape with a bridgedeck-mounted traveler. A cabintop-mounted traveler was an option, but there seems to be little to recommend it. The cockpit seats are comfortable for sitting but too short to lie down on. The forward part of the coaming is OK for sitting, but youll be inclined only to stand on the cockpit sole, aft of the bench seats. The cockpit is definitely skewed a little toward the racing side of this boats dual purpose, and its a much better cockpit underway than dockside.

Hardware is good quality and well arranged. The standard winches are of adequate size, though the boat is stiff enough to carry a heavy 150-percent genoa in 20 knots of wind, and thats a handful for the No. 24 primaries, unless the racing crew is on board.

As is the case in most boats of the 33s vintage, theres not too much abovedecks storage room. An anchor well forward will stow a Danforth, but everything else will have to go into the one aft locker under the starboard cockpit seat. Its a cavernous locker, but the serious cruiser will have to devise a way to subdivide it to make it more usable. Behind the helmsman are a small locker for propane bottles and a small stowage spot for winch handles.

The arrangements belowdecks are conventional: V-berth forward, head with shower opposite a hanging locker; port and starboard settees outboard of a saloon table; L-shaped galley; nav station at the head of a double quarterberth (well, maybe a one-and-three-quarter quarterberth). From the center bulkhead aft, the boat is wide open, which seems to us like a more sensible arrangement than the Euro compartmentalizing of the aft cabin and aft head, at least in a boat this size.

A few notable details: A decent built-in bureau in the forward cabin is a nice touch. The head compartment is a single fiberglass molding, including the wash basin-all compact, well designed, and easier to clean. The galley is quite serviceable, with a good stove and a stainless bash bar to keep you from crashing into it.

The teak overhead and bulkhead veneer contrast with the off-white hull liner. The liner is well done, with removable panels for servicing hardware fittings, wiring, and so on.

Overall, the cabin is comfortable. Weve often heard older C&Cs rapped as leaky boats, with drips around windows and under heavily loaded deck hardware, but the boat we sailed was completely dry.

Owners Comments

The biggest complaints among the C&C 33 Mark II owners that Practical Sailor surveyed were engine access and cabin ventilation. Nearly all noted that it was a challenge to access the engine easily, and most reported that their boat upgrades including increasing belowdecks ventilation with solar vents or other openings.

Interestingly, most gave the boat an average rating for stability but rated the seaworthiness as good or better. The majority of those surveyed rated the boats upwind and off-the-wind performance equally good; only a handful said the upwind performance was better.

Some things to keep in mind if youre shopping for a C&C 33: Check for leaks around the chainplates and look for stress cracking in the deck, signs the boat had a hard racing life and the backstay likely saw too much pressure. A few surveyed owners reported blisters, but both said the problem was minor. One owner cautioned others to check the transmission shaft cable as his was not installed and adjusted properly, resulting in premature clutch failure.

Conclusions

If youre entirely devoted to racing, wed probably suggest looking at something different-maybe a J/33, or possibly a J/35. For those who solely cruise, wed also recommend different boats-maybe something more like a Tartan 34 or a Mason 33. But if you plan to do a good share of racing, some serious weekending, and at least one long, shorthanded cruise per season, then the C&C 33 is among the boats we suggest checking out. Although in some ways, it seems plain and indistinctive, the C&C 33 is admirably suited to be both a racer and a cruiser. Its a boat for sailors who truly want a racer-cruiser. C&Cs also hold their value well, so buying one would be a sound investment, and there are plenty in good condition to be had on the resale market, especially in Canada.

Editors note: This review is an updated and expanded version of one previously published.

  • C&C 33 Mark II Owners

The Dual-Purpose C&C 33 Mark II

RELATED ARTICLES MORE FROM AUTHOR

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Log in to leave a comment

Latest Videos

Beneteau 46.1: What You Should Know | Boat Tour video from Practical Sailor

Beneteau 46.1: What You Should Know | Boat Tour

How to Clean Your Sails video from Practical Sailor

How to Clean Your Sails

C&C 40: What You Should Know | Boat Review video from Practical Sailor

C&C 40: What You Should Know | Boat Review

A Simple Solution for Boat Toilet Stink video from Practical Sailor

A Simple Solution for Boat Toilet Stink

  • Privacy Policy
  • Do Not Sell My Personal Information
  • Online Account Activation
  • Privacy Manager

Yachthub

Used Yachts For Sale

Sail monohulls 30ft > 35ft,        yamaha boats for sale, yamaha 33 boats for sale.

yamaha 33 sailboat review

Seabreeze.com.au

Forums > Sailing > > General

Donk107

TAS, 2446 posts

Thumbs Up

Hi all One of the guys down here just bought a Yamaha 33 and it looks like a nicely built boat yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/yamaha-33-sloop/181887 Interesting placement of the engine under the forward v berth Any thoughts or experiences Regards Don

VIC, 5814 posts

southace

SA, 4761 posts

I fitted a new yanmar to one about 20 years ago, there's nothing like pulling a engine out and in through the forward hatch!

I've got a Yamaha 25, and in fact, it's the second Yamaha 25 I've owned. Good, solid, honestly built boats - shame that Yamaha got out of the sailboat construction business. My 25 is about 40 years old, and is still a fun day sailer and short overnighter (can sleep 5!). One of the most roomy 25's I've seen, due to IOR 1/4ton heritage (fat centre sections). Yanmar 8 under forward berth; I completely rebuilt it last winter, and just put castors on it and rolled it aft to the main hatch and lifted it from there. Cheers, Bob

twodogs1969

twodogs1969

NSW, 1000 posts

Donk107 said... Hi all One of the guys down here just bought a Yamaha 33 and it looks like a nicely built boat yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/yamaha-33-sloop/181887 Interesting placement of the engine under the forward v berth Any thoughts or experiences Regards Don A friend of mine he is on here as I think bigfred has a yamaha 33. He has recently replaced the Yanmar with a beta 30 hp he actually did it all himself and is very happy with it. .

Pit Pony

NSW, 21 posts

yamaha 33 sailboat review

WA, 1562 posts

Nice job Big Fred you have done her justice well done. My personal thing about 12 Hp is probably more about some older American sail boats with full keels heavy displacement and have fitted low Hp Engines if a mast came down in the middle of an ocean it would get a bit hard to push through a rough sea with 12 Hp some West Sails have low HP engines and that's a lot of boat to get back to shore if you're 1200 Klms from

"Yamaha 33" started by Donk107

Send message.

Copyright © 1997-2024 Seabreeze.com.au - All Rights Reserved.

IMAGES

  1. Yamaha 33

    yamaha 33 sailboat review

  2. 1979 Yamaha 33 Sloop Sailboat

    yamaha 33 sailboat review

  3. 33 ft. YAMAHA SAILBOAT Outside Edmonton Area, Edmonton

    yamaha 33 sailboat review

  4. Yamaha 33 Yacht

    yamaha 33 sailboat review

  5. Yamaha 33 Yacht

    yamaha 33 sailboat review

  6. Yamaha 33 Cruising Yacht

    yamaha 33 sailboat review

VIDEO

  1. Yamaha MK 21

  2. Amazing boat fits in a box

  3. 2016 june 25 sailing Yamaha 25 from Port Choiseul to Vidy

  4. Mika & Vesa Kallio Ice Racing

  5. Alerion Yachts 33 Underway

  6. 1979 Hunter 33' Sailboat

COMMENTS

  1. Yamaha 33 would you buy one today?

    Aug 25, 2015. 10. Yamaha 33 Bellingham. Aug 25, 2015. #1. Hello All. Looking at a 1978 Yamaha 33. It is outfitted with all fairly new electronics, set up for crossing to Hawaii out of WA State with ten fairly new sails in last couple years. The boat is very clean considering making an offer on her but curious if you were new in the sailing game ...

  2. YAMAHA 33

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  3. Yamaha 33s info

    Super Anarchist. 1,040. 313. Apr 21, 2024. #1. Hello once again, ive been looking at the boats (still trying to figure out if there anything more fitting to my choice than FCE) and stumbled upon quite in interesting one, Yamaha 33s, its fairly modern looking, has nice lines and seems to perform well, but i dont seem to fing any info about them ...

  4. Chronicling the Rescue and Refubishment of my Yamaha 33

    I commenced my search for a sailboat in February, 2016. The process was as pleasant as having one's anal hairs plucked. In February of this year, I spotted a Yamaha 33 called "Liming" for sale in Sidney, B.C. I had initially been warded off by her tiller, her price, and by the fact that she had been on the market for quite some time.

  5. Yamaha 33

    Yamaha 33 is a 33′ 4″ / 10.2 m monohull sailboat designed by Peter Norlin and built by Yamaha starting in 1976. ... (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33) D: Displacement of the boat in pounds; LWL: Waterline length in feet; LOA: Length overall in feet; Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet; 21.18 <20: lightweight racing boat. 20 ...

  6. Yamaha 33

    I have sailed a Yamaha 33 several times, and liked it a lot. Quite fast, handled very nicely, pretty boat, generally very well put together. Only odd bit is the weird engine installation - tiny Yanmar right up in the bow with an ultra-long propshaft that ran right through the bilge to the stern gland under the cockpit.

  7. Is this Y-33 worth restoring?

    HI all, This is probably the only group I could find active threads about the Yamaha 33, hopefully I could get insights from you guys with the 33. Recently a friend of mine wants to get rid of his Y33 due to extensive leaking, having inspected the boat myself I'm on the edge whether to take it and restore it or let the guy scrap it.

  8. Tour of our Yamaha 33 Sailboat

    In this video, we open all the cupboards and drawers, and show you around our house and studio. We have a Yamaha 33, tall rig, built in 1982 named Pino.Thank...

  9. Review of Yamaha 33

    The DL-ratio for Yamaha 33 is 222 which categorizes this boat among 'light crusers & offshore racers'. Heavy Light 62% 0 50 100. 62% of all similar sailboat designs are categorized as heavier. A light displacement requires less sailarea and has higher accellerations.

  10. Yamaha 36 Sloop

    The Yamaha 33 is was drawn to meet the old International Offshore Rule by Peter Norlin for the Yamaha design team. One of the hallmarks of these designs is the tall, high-aspect mainsail that won't sail well with out a headsail. Earlier Yamaha 33's were equipped with an under-powered single cylinder Yanmar YSM12 diesel located in the bow.

  11. Yamaha 33

    The Yamaha 33 is a 33.33ft masthead sloop designed by Yamaha/Norlin and built in fiberglass by Yamaha since 1976. The Yamaha 33 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is originally very small.

  12. Tartan 33: Scheel Keel Pioneer

    The Tartan 33's offshore ambitions are evident in Cynosure, owned by Practical Sailor contributor Bill Herrmann . By the late 1970s, the old Tartan 34 had become very dated. The boat had been in production for a decade, and hundreds of families had cut their racing and cruising teeth on the S&S keel/centerboarder. But the market was changing.

  13. Yamaha 33 as offshore cruiser?

    Jeff_H. 12354 posts · Joined 2000. #2 · Nov 12, 2002. I have limited experience with the Yamaha 33 in onshore sailing that would suggest that they would not make very good offshore boats. The Yamahas were intended to be IOR racer/cruisers and based on my experience with their sailing characteristics they would make a nice coastal cruiser but ...

  14. The Dual-Purpose C&C 33 Mark II

    The C&C 33 is often referred to as the new C&C 33 or the C&C 33 Mark II (33-2), to distinguish it from the C&C 33 Mark I, which was produced between 1974 and l977. While some of the specs are similar, the Mark II is an entirely different boat, not sharing any of the tooling of the Mark I. The Mark I was widely regarded as one of the prettiest ...

  15. 1981 Yamaha Boats 33 Racer/Cruiser for sale

    Description. 1981 Yamaha Boats 33. Very successful on the racing circuit, many recent upgrades and replacements including both standing and running rigging and new Yanmar motor. Sea Tow Unlimited towing good until 12/28/23 and fully transferable! PRICE DROP 3/15/23 OWNER SAYS GET HER SOLD!

  16. Used Yamaha 33 for Sale

    Australiawide Boat Sales. Manly QLD. Renowned for designing the Sweden, Najad, Albin & Elan yachts amongst others, Swedish naval architect Peter Norlin, put his formidable skills to use for Yamaha in the 1970's to draw the rather delightful Yamaha 33 of which over 80 were produced. Imported into Australia in 2024 by her current owner of 20 ...

  17. A Yamaha 33 sailboat

    We found a boat :DThx for watching!-Rek & Dev🐇About: https://100r.co🐇Support: https://100r.co/site/support.html🐇Our tools & games: https://hundredrabbits....

  18. Yamaha

    Yamaha. This division of the Japanese motor company built and exported sailboats to the US for a few years (beginning in the late 1970's). Later it was called the New Japan Yacht Company. Years in Business: 0 - present.

  19. Yamaha 33

    Hi Donk, as twodogs said I currently own a Yamaha 33. When talking to other sailors about the boat the topic of the engine under the V berth almost always raises it head. I must admit that prior to purchasing the boat the weight of the engine up front gave me some cause for concern as to how it would perform in a seaway.